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Author Topic: The gardening thread  (Read 51747 times)

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foolsgold

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #450 on: April 28, 2018, 06:20:58 PM »

Memorial day weekend Lowes has a special of $2.50 bags ou'd mulch that includes free delivery. Or, at least they have the last couple years.
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daytime drinking

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #451 on: April 29, 2018, 10:54:17 PM »

there's a place in blue ash that has free compost, mulch, and dirt.  it's from all the local curbside pick ups.  i have more information if anyone's interested.  you have to pick it up and most times you have to back up to the gate and set out on foot with five gallon buckets.  but it's free
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #452 on: April 30, 2018, 08:03:28 PM »

I hit the gardening wall today.

The unfortunate casualty is going to be this Baby Joe Pye weed.  Too bad, because tI was really looking forward to planting that.  But the plants came all twisted up and kept falling over in their pots, and then they were overly pot bound and dried up no matter how much I watered.

So, with the situation desperate, and them needing to be planted today I had nowhere to put them.  Their designated place is still filled with infernal daffodils that would require serious digging.  Which just shows how great a place it was that there were so many daffodils ands weeds there.

So I found a different place, which I had semi cleared out.  But that place seems to be pretty dry, which is horrible for Joe Pye weed, which likes it on the wet side.  I didnít even dig a bed.  I just dumped an ass,lad of mulch over the grass and then dug barely big enough hole.  If anything survives it will be a bonus.  In the meantime, the mulch will hopefully knock down the grass and set me up to plant something there next year.  Or not.  Who cares?

I did have a pretty awesome survival rate on stuff I planted last fall, so thatís good. I think I lost two turtleheads, a fern, a coreopsis, and maybe two asters out of close to 200 plants. 

My Meyer lemon survived the winter indoors.  It was looking kind of crap and the leaves all fell off, but now it has tons of new leaves and buds.

All my shrubs and trees made it, which is the important thing because they are most expensive and take up space and need the most time to grow.  So 4 Clethra, a witch hazel, two fringe trees (and they both have fringes already), 6 shamrock hollies, 3 viburnum, 1 hydrangea, and 3 chokeberries, 1 Illicium parvaflorum , 5 Itea all looking good.

My columbine actually grew huge and flowered, which never happened before.  Usually they survive for me, but just kinda struggle for their 2-3 year lifespan without ever flowering.  Also my green-and-gold flowered, which is another plant that I plant and five years later I find tiny surviving bits still but it never takes off or flowers.

I think it helps that I had my rain gardens dug professionally, and that I planted all natives.  And that I planted way late into the fall and actually even winter.  Like seriously half that stuff went into the ground a week or two before the big snowstorm on December 8.   Heat just kills everything.  The snow actually provided an insulating later then kept the ground moist for weeks.  Of course, then I stupidly planted in the spring again.

daytime drinking

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #453 on: April 30, 2018, 08:50:45 PM »

not the joe pye weed!  it's my favorite plant.  love seeing that shit in the wild because it's pretty remarkable when you see anything native anymore.  naturally, one has to venture into protected places to glimpse it.  what's your native population, percentage wise?
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notoriouspbake

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #454 on: April 30, 2018, 10:25:35 PM »

just checking in to give a thumbs up for all the native plants!

zafe, no coneflowers? purple loves full sun.
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #455 on: May 01, 2018, 01:00:01 AM »

what's your native population, percentage wise?

Of the stuff I planted, 100%.

I have three ligustrums I inherited which are really horrible, invasive plants.  They are probably leftover from what was once a privet hedge but have grown into small trees.  I decided to leave them for now but they may go at some point. 

Other than that everything is native, but not hardcore native.  Itís probably like 60% hardcore straight species that are native to Richmond and 40% that are either ďnativarsĒ (selectively bred or hybridized from natives) and/or native to East Coast but probably not Richmond.  Iím most excited by the Rattlesnake Master.  So far, they are tiny and Iíve almost stepped on them a dozen times but they are healthy as hell and hopefully will grow to 4 or 5 feet eventually.  I donít know if they will flower this year or not.

I have a container garden on my deck that is non-native.  Itís like strawberries, a dwarf peach, a dwarf lemon, flowering annuals, and some vegetables.

Zafer Kaya

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #456 on: May 01, 2018, 01:04:12 AM »

just checking in to give a thumbs up for all the native plants!

zafe, no coneflowers? purple loves full sun.

I just planted them out on Sunday.  I donít know about them.  I started them from seed way early but they took forever to germinate, and then they took forever to grow.  The ones I planted still only have two tiny leaves and are less than an inch tall even though they have been outside in starter pots for over a month.

va-vacious

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #457 on: May 01, 2018, 09:30:38 PM »

I finally got a pot of day lilies into the ground, two years after I bought them. They are the orange variety, and I bought them at a plant sale at the historic cemetery. They divide plants that are planted (and survive) at the graves, as well as get new plants.

I got a butterfly bush that I am hoping will do well, and moved some lambs ear around.

I'd like to get more natives, but that is going to take awhile.
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notoriouspbake

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #458 on: May 02, 2018, 10:27:14 AM »

Iím most excited by the Rattlesnake Master.  So far, they are tiny and Iíve almost stepped on them a dozen times but they are healthy as hell and hopefully will grow to 4 or 5 feet eventually.  I donít know if they will flower this year or not.


i've used rattlesnake master in a native plant lab i use in class with my seniors. cool plant, monocot. FYI, all monocots have the stomates arranged in parallel rows. dicots have random placements. i tried to post a pic we took but couldn't figure it out.
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #459 on: May 02, 2018, 01:19:48 PM »

Huh.  That's interesting.

I never really thought about it, but I guess I assumed they were dicots because they have tap-roots. 

What I learned in HS bio:

Monocot:
One cotyledon
Fibrous/network root system
Flower parts arranged in groups of 3

Dicot:
Two cotyledons
Taproot/central root system
Flower parts arranged in groups of 4 or 5

Endicott:
No cotyledons
Up from 5:00
Givin' it all he's got

notoriouspbake

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #460 on: May 02, 2018, 08:55:20 PM »

monocots have parallel veins on their leaves.

this is a cool site to learn about natives: https://www.wildflower.org/plants-main/
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MissKitty

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #461 on: May 04, 2018, 04:57:06 PM »


Endicott:
No cotyledons
Up from 5:00
Givin' it all he's got

WIN!
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #462 on: May 18, 2018, 03:53:16 PM »

Man, I don't know what to do about violets.

I think the flowers are kind of pretty, and they are native so I hate to kill them.  People are always planting wild ginger, and to me, native viola are just wild ginger only with flowers.  Leaves are almost the same, and both are good ground covers.

OTOH, they spread everywhere.  And they don't stay a reasonable size.  They get gigantic and crowd everything out.  Also, while some might like the foliage... I don't.  If it would just behave itself and grow in small patches to fill in my beds I'd be fine with it but it doesn't.

So far I'm just pulling it.  Which does absolutely nothing to actually stop it, but it does pretty up the garden temporarily.  Maybe that's how I will make peace with it.  By just half-ass weeding it with no herbicide there will always be enough to grow and flower and sustain itself but it will stay somewhat under control.  Of course, that means a ton of weeding.

Also, the Baby Joe Pye weed lived.  It's actually been growing like gangbusters the last week.

foolsgold

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #463 on: May 18, 2018, 10:13:08 PM »

We've had some luck putting violets in large pots. It doesn't look nearly as good as it does on a lawn, but it's a decent compromise. Now our yard is mostly free of them and have been replaced by a good half dozen other kinds of creeping groundcover (and giant trenches from the  voles and rooting roots of a tree we took down.) I'm not going to pay one of those lawn care companies to come give me a nice looking  yard. I just don't care that much, am lazy, would feel bad paying for something like that. So,
I can live with pretty much anything so long it's green.
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #464 on: May 21, 2018, 12:03:46 PM »

Yeah, I'm okay with violets in the lawn.  Just not sure I want them in my beds.

I made a little flagstone pathway and the violets are totally taking over between and alongside the stones and I'm okay with that.  I put down mulch and I go through after a rain and spend 15 minutes randomly pulling some out just to keep it thin and somewhat in control but I don't mind it being kind of a violet meadow.

The Bermuda grass is bothering me far more than the violets at this point, though.  I'm debating whether to forgo my organic gardening goals and just the beds with a one-time application of Round-up.  I don't know how I will get rid of the Bermuda grass (and bindweed) otherwise.  If I could just clear it out from those areas one time real good, then I can probably manage the beds through hand pulling from then on. 

But I dunno, full sun plus decent soil is Bermuda grass heaven.  I am pretty sure some asshole at some point actually seeded the yard with Bermuda, so not even sure if Round-up would fix the problem.  I cannot stand Bermuda grass.  It's ugly, it's non-native, it's insanely invasive.
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