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Author Topic: The gardening thread  (Read 30043 times)

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Zafer Kaya

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 2,775
Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #420 on: August 11, 2017, 12:32:02 PM »

Do you do the square foot gardening thing?  I bet powdery mildew is a bitch if you grow in raised beds that way.

Plants got to breathe.  It prevents the moisture retention that causes the mildew, plus then they are farther apart so the mildew doesn't spread so easily.  Of course if you do that, then you can only grow like half as much stuff.

I don't understand why people even vegetable garden.

Planting is a pain.  Then all the netting and applying organic pesticides that don't work while stuff is growing to keep the bugs and voles and whatever away.  Then you have to harvest.  And then you have to plant cover crop. 

If you actually get it all right, and you get a bumper crop... then what?  What do you do with extra 150 tomatoes?  You can't use them all, so you preserve them.  Why?  You don't need to preserve tomatoes if you have a garden cranking out tomatoes three seasons of the year.  You're only preserving them because you feel like it's a waste if you don't eat them.  But no.  That's not the waste.  You know what the waste was?  You spending all the effort to grow tomatoes.

But that's not even enough.  You got to make it extra hard on yourself.  Pressure treated wood for my raised beds?  Hell no.  That stuff actually lasts a good 25 years.  Who wants that?  I'd much rather spend an extra $500 for cedar that I have to replace every 5 years.

Farmers are not doing well in the US. Think about it.  Their entire livelihood depends on their crops.  They do this 24/7.  And, they don't make it extra hard on themselves with the eco-pesticides and non-GMO.  They have tractors and sprinkling systems and everything you can get to make growing shit as easy as possible.  And it still doesn't work.

Oh but I get 50,000 seeds that yield 1,000,000 tomatoes for like $25!  It's so cheap!  No.  It isn't.  One free tomato seed plus potting soil plus netting plus stakes plus water plus whatever pesticide.  Price that shit out.  It's not cheaper than buying tomatoes at the store.  It's not even cheaper than buying tomatoes at the Farmer's Market from some asshole who tries to grow them the hard way like you do.

The whole thing is just a simple exercise in how well you understand sunk costs.  Everyone fails.

You're not growing a vegetable garden.  You're growing a squash borer habitat and vermin sanctuary.  Which is nice for the wildlife I guess.

daytime drinking

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 1,122
Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #421 on: August 11, 2017, 02:52:14 PM »

we rarely weed or water our small plot.  we throw our compost on the garden bed (i made a raised stone bed a few years ago) after the season's over and right before it starts.  it's mostly tomatoes, peppers, and herbs.  i used to get excited about making spaghetti sauce but now i see three giant tomatoes and don't feel like doing anything about it because i'm already overwhelmed.  i eventually get around to a bumper crop with as little waste as possible.  once i'm actually making the shit, i get back into my groove.  but yeah, we have been growing a less variety of produce.  the tomatoes however, could use a significant pruning.  it's hard to get back there
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daytime drinking

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 1,122
Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #422 on: August 12, 2017, 12:36:15 AM »

you are most likely right zafer, but i would think that would pertain more to people such as ourselves in urban environments.  even though some people find every aspect of gardening therapeutic.  weeding has been enjoyable for me when we had a couple plots at various community gardens.  i had room to stretch out and really get my ass in the ground.  fucking chiggers man.  i'm not really great or astute at any aspect of gardening, but it's worth it just to be able to walk outside and pick a green pepper.  the worst that happens is you'll tell em you'll get em next year and halfway believe it because you're putting the garden down with a purpose.  i love putting the garden down.  that shit's fun.  the biggest takeaway with a vegetable garden is that you get to spend time outside and put in some work 

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Zafer Kaya

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 2,775
Re: The gardening thread
« Reply #423 on: August 13, 2017, 02:24:22 PM »

Yep.  You nailed it.  That's actually the secret to vegetable gardening that for whatever reason, people don't want to admit.  It isn't about the vegetables. It's the process. 

I just totally kicked ass today.  I bought this garden cart, so I got up today with my tool set.  Assembled it in about an hour.  Then I dug a bed.  The ground was as perfect as I have ever dug, and I have dug a lot.  We had a nice, on and off light rain for two days.  So my edging shovel was just slicing through the grass like a knife through better.  It was coming up in these beautiful crumbly chunks.  You could just grab a big chunk without it falling apart, but slam it in the ground, and the soil was just crumble away.  Toss the grass and roots left in your hand.

The one thing I am really good at is digging beds.  I was in the zone, instantly seeing exactly how much ground I could take up in the next shovel.  I dug out about a 6x10 area in maybe an hour or so.  Then got the turning fork, turned it over.  Got the hie, smoothed it out.

Then I went to the hardware store and in two trips bought like 20 bags of mulch, 10 bags of leaf gro, and a bunch of lumber and stuff.

Came back, threw down the leaf gro, turned it over and smoothed it out again.  Then I laid down the mulch,  and I got to wheel the garden cart back and forth doing all this.

Then I broke out the saw, cut up the lumber, got the tools out and built a 4x6 bed.  Went back to the hardware store, loaded up on  vermiculite, peat moss and compost.  Threw that in, raked it out.  Perfect.

I wanted to dig another bed, but I knew my back would hurt if I pushed it.  So I stopped, but it was still not bad because I know I have another three beds at least look forward to.

But here's the thing with perennials.  Once I plant those beds, it's over.  I will never use the garden cart or the edging shovel or fork, etc again.  In fact that fork was brand new and had been sitting in the basement if my last house for like ten years.

I will still have to mulch, but I won't ever get to just lay down big heaping mounds and rake it all smooth and fluffy.  I'll just do little handfuls at a time.  In 2-3 years maybe the plants can be divided, but that is not fun.  It actually makes your garden look worse for a bit.  And you don't get to eat the plants, you just throw them away.

So yeah, if you vegetable garden, you get to start new and plant all the time.  You are always growing, instead of just tending to what has grown. 
« Last Edit: August 13, 2017, 02:26:16 PM by Zafer Kaya »
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