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Author Topic: books and how you acquire them  (Read 1722 times)

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daytime drinking

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books and how you acquire them
« on: December 25, 2013, 10:35:31 AM »

i support my library by not supporting it.  i haven't step foot into a library since i last voted well over a year ago.  i don't like the convenience and the perishable nature of the service they provide.  i love having a list in mind and going to half price and coming away with a stack of books for $10 that you had no intention of buying.  i'm also very fond of those cool old book stores that are three stories tall.  find you a nice hard cover for cheap.  my friends loan me books and i try to make it a point to not keep those on the back burner as i would like to have discussions about the book. 

i started a book club with some couchsurfers but left it as i selfishly wanted to read my own books.  i didn't care for the options those chose which isn't very open minded of me.  they're a liberal group and only wanted to read non fiction or some uplifting story about a minority or a different culture.  i have no problem with those types of books accept that's all they wanted to read about.  i have a hard time with non fiction.  reality in general i struggle with.  ha 

i have an insatiable urge to collect things.  i may collect books for some narcissistic reason but i also am fond of just staring at my book shelf and reminiscing.   it's probably a mix of the two.  though walking with a paperback sticking out of your back pocket might be a little pretentious, unless it's war and peace, that's kinda cool
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Dan

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2013, 11:22:44 AM »

I'm pretty much the opposite. I like reading, but I don't like having to move books every time I move apartments. So I try to give them away if I bought them, or (preferably) I try to borrow books from other people. I look at it like this: if there is very little chance that I will ever read the book again, then why keep it? I have a few that I keep, and even a few that I will read multiple times, but mostly when I'm done with a book I know I will next want to read something new so I won't read that again. It is strange to some, I know.

This would indicate that I love libraries, but the truth is that I haven't had a library membership in a great many years. I know so many people who have a ton of books that there's always another one for me to borrow. And I won't have to worry about a deadline.
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foolsgold

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2013, 07:12:17 PM »

My work buys them for me.  Well, their money does and I get what I want to read.  Otherwise, I'll occasionally hit Half Price Books or one of those used bookstores that smell of mildew you mentioned.  Also, a fair share come from airports when I finish what I'm reading and so have hours before I get home.  Portland's airport has a Powell's that sells some used books which is pretty cool.
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Drjohnrock

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2013, 10:14:11 PM »

The books I tend to buy are from independent or specialty publishers which aren't likely to be found in libraries--stuff on local history, music, craft beer/beer history.  Wish I lived closer to a Half Price Books--I would stop in more often. 

There's a new bookstore in downtown Cincinnati on Vine Street right across from Fountain Square called Booksellers.  Great place, and has a good selection of the stuff I like, as well as lots of other titles.  It's well worth checking out.  I stare at a computer screen quite a bit in my work which grates on my eyes so I'm not really into  Kindle and the like.  I hope the printed word doesn't entirely disappear.  If you agree with me about that, support your local bookstore!
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daytime drinking

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2013, 10:40:00 AM »

The books I tend to buy are from independent or specialty publishers which aren't likely to be found in libraries--stuff on local history, music, craft beer/beer history.  Wish I lived closer to a Half Price Books--I would stop in more often. 

There's a new bookstore in downtown Cincinnati on Vine Street right across from Fountain Square called Booksellers.  Great place, and has a good selection of the stuff I like, as well as lots of other titles.  It's well worth checking out.  I stare at a computer screen quite a bit in my work which grates on my eyes so I'm not really into  Kindle and the like.  I hope the printed word doesn't entirely disappear.  If you agree with me about that, support your local bookstore!

agreed.  i rue the day the physical disappear.  i think the printed word will stand the test of time though.  they've proven hardy thus far.  have you been to ohio book store on main?  i've spoken with the owner quite a few times and he's as pleasant and smart as they come.  great place.  powell books indeed rocks.  i was in oregon for three weeks a few years ago and luckily didn't spend as much money as i should have as i still needed to get home. 
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Drjohnrock

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2013, 11:31:29 AM »

The books I tend to buy are from independent or specialty publishers which aren't likely to be found in libraries--stuff on local history, music, craft beer/beer history.  Wish I lived closer to a Half Price Books--I would stop in more often. 

There's a new bookstore in downtown Cincinnati on Vine Street right across from Fountain Square called Booksellers.  Great place, and has a good selection of the stuff I like, as well as lots of other titles.  It's well worth checking out.  I stare at a computer screen quite a bit in my work which grates on my eyes so I'm not really into  Kindle and the like.  I hope the printed word doesn't entirely disappear.  If you agree with me about that, support your local bookstore!

agreed.  i rue the day the physical disappear.  i think the printed word will stand the test of time though.  they've proven hardy thus far.  have you been to ohio book store on main?  i've spoken with the owner quite a few times and he's as pleasant and smart as they come.  great place.  powell books indeed rocks.  i was in oregon for three weeks a few years ago and luckily didn't spend as much money as i should have as i still needed to get home.



I used to really like the Ohio Book Store.  But the last time I went there the jerk behind the counter was very rude without any provocation from me.  All I ever did was buy stuff from them.  In fact, I need to do a negative review of the place elsewhere on the net.  Thanks for the reminder. 

This Powell books sounds interesting.  Are they a local or regional chain?  Would like to check them out if I get the chance.
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I refuse to shut up about Johnny Dowd until the world recognizes his musical genius.  I may lose my voice before that happens but at least I can enjoy the man's music while going mute.

Don't feed trolls by responding to or acknowledging them.

daytime drinking

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2013, 12:04:07 PM »

The books I tend to buy are from independent or specialty publishers which aren't likely to be found in libraries--stuff on local history, music, craft beer/beer history.  Wish I lived closer to a Half Price Books--I would stop in more often. 

There's a new bookstore in downtown Cincinnati on Vine Street right across from Fountain Square called Booksellers.  Great place, and has a good selection of the stuff I like, as well as lots of other titles.  It's well worth checking out.  I stare at a computer screen quite a bit in my work which grates on my eyes so I'm not really into  Kindle and the like.  I hope the printed word doesn't entirely disappear.  If you agree with me about that, support your local bookstore!

agreed.  i rue the day the physical disappear.  i think the printed word will stand the test of time though.  they've proven hardy thus far.  have you been to ohio book store on main?  i've spoken with the owner quite a few times and he's as pleasant and smart as they come.  great place.  powell books indeed rocks.  i was in oregon for three weeks a few years ago and luckily didn't spend as much money as i should have as i still needed to get home.



I used to really like the Ohio Book Store.  But the last time I went there the jerk behind the counter was very rude without any provocation from me.  All I ever did was buy stuff from them.  In fact, I need to do a negative review of the place elsewhere on the net.  Thanks for the reminder. 

This Powell books sounds interesting.  Are they a local or regional chain?  Would like to check them out if I get the chance.

the only powell i know of (outside of the airport that foolsgold mentioned, which i've never heard of) is in the pearl district of portland.  you might run into colin meloy of the decemberists as i didn't. 

that sucks about your latest experience with ohio book store.  i hope that clerk is forced to read some nora roberts
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daytime drinking

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2013, 01:17:23 PM »

here's a question for those that buy books.  do any of you wait until you have exhausted your library before making a purchase, or do just really need to get to the book store for god knows why?  i really need to get to the book store even though probably half of what i have i haven't read.  considering i stick to the classics mainly, i've got heaps of dickens and henry millers and tolstoy and twain etc... that really haven't called me.  plus i'm ever on the hunt for that elusive book that will top jaroslav hasek's good soldier sjevk or don quixote or some vonnegut or hesse book i haven't read.  it'd be absolute tits if i could find some bohumil hrabel at half price, but none luck thus far
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2013, 02:09:21 PM »

i didn't care for the options those chose which isn't very open minded of me.  they're a liberal group and only wanted to read non fiction or some uplifting story about a minority or a different culture.

I think I know the kind of book you're talking about.  They are the ones that typically end up on Oprah's book club or whatever.

For me it's not the fact that someone is a minority or a different culture per se, but rather that the protagonists are so passive because the story is not really about them but rather about "the times" or injustice or some broad theme that is obvious. 

It's not like I feel like people have to be super-heroes and go down with guns blazing or triumph over the odds or anything.  But I need some kind of personal insight into their lives and what they are thinking.   I get that life and society are massively screwing you over, but exactly how does this make you feel?  I don't need 1,000 pages to know that your loved ones dying from starvation or war and being poor probably sucks bigtime.  But give me some insight into exactly how it sucks.  That's never happened to me so I'm interested in what it's really like. 

Except the characters don't seem to do anything except survive/endure.  What do you expect?  People don't just disappear off the face of the Earth because something bad happened to them.  I mean, I'm sure there are rocks and trees that were around at the beginning of the story and the end that "endured" but I don't really care.  Might as well write about those things if your protagonist tells me nothing.  The Good Earth or Their Eyes were Watching God are prime examples of books that annoy me like that.  Those sweeping epic kinds of book.

I never buy books anymore.  In fact, I've been giving away most of mine.  They take up too much space in your house and if you ever move they are a total PITA to pack, lug around and unpack.  When I was younger, I used to be more into collecting books.  And I used to order from Powell's all the time back in the mid/late 90's.  I've been there several times in person but for some reason I find the physical location less impressive than the website.

I'm not into non-fiction either.  If its a topic I'm interested in, I'll read it.  But if its like, about the Civil War and it's exhaustively researched and has new interpretations or new discoveries and gets rave reviews and is unanimously agreed that its well written I still won't read it because I just don't care that much about the Civil War.  Whereas I will often read a fiction book about something that doesn't on its surface sound that appealing just because everyone says the author did such a good job on it.  If it's on a year end top ten list and it's fiction, I'll try and read it.  I pay almost no attention to top 10 non-fiction lists.

MissKitty

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2013, 06:27:35 PM »

I utilize the library heavily. In fact, I hold library cards for seven different library systems, although I rarely use four of them because they are too far away (but if I can't find a book I want within the local library systems, I will check those farther afield and borrow if they have what I want).

I can't remember the last book I actually purchased because most everything I read is from the library. I figure that since I am not very likely to reread a book, why buy it when I can borrow it instead? Why buy a book just to have it sit on a shelf collecting dust after it's been read? And like ZK said, they are a PITA to lug around if you move house. If I decide that I do want to reread a book, I can simply borrow the book again.

That said, when CR and I are in England, we always drop by a little independent barber shop in town because the locals donate books to the barber, and he resells them for the equivalent of a dollar or two each, and the funds go to a cancer charity. We rock the hell out of the barber bookshop, and if we finish the books while still in England, we donate them right back. We tend to pick up books there that haven't had a release in the states (stuff like biographies of British actors, musicians, comedians etc).

As far as used book shops over here, I rarely venture into them. I did visit Ohio Bookstore over the summer, but it was to order a special archival box for an 1830 family bible that has seen better days. It seems like a nice bookshop, but I'm just not interested.

Oh yeah, I remember the last books I bought - my company gets loads of new books for review, and they are sold off for $2 each and the money goes to St. Joseph Orphanage. I bought four books there, and after I have finished them they are being passed on to other friends and coworkers.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2013, 06:31:05 PM by MissKitty »
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Drjohnrock

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2013, 07:31:02 PM »

here's a question for those that buy books.  do any of you wait until you have exhausted your library before making a purchase, or do just really need to get to the book store for god knows why?  i really need to get to the book store even though probably half of what i have i haven't read.  considering i stick to the classics mainly, i've got heaps of dickens and henry millers and tolstoy and twain etc... that really haven't called me.  plus i'm ever on the hunt for that elusive book that will top jaroslav hasek's good soldier sjevk or don quixote or some vonnegut or hesse book i haven't read.  it'd be absolute tits if i could find some bohumil hrabel at half price, but none luck thus far



I don't feel the need to exhaust my library before getting another book.  I'm the same way about music--I still have a fair amount of vinyl and CDs that I got dirt cheap from a record store that closed a while back that I still haven't listened to but that hasn't kept me from buying newer music.

As far as Vonnegut goes, have you ever read his first novel, Player Piano?  It doesn't get the attention of, say, Slaughterhouse Five or The Sirens Of Titan but it's a great read, especially when you consider the era in which it was written (early '50s anti-communist hysteria--just substitute "communist" for the word "saboteur" which appears again and again in the book and you'll see what I mean)
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I refuse to shut up about Johnny Dowd until the world recognizes his musical genius.  I may lose my voice before that happens but at least I can enjoy the man's music while going mute.

Don't feed trolls by responding to or acknowledging them.

Zafer Kaya

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2013, 01:13:41 AM »

I love Sirens of Titan.  Definitely my favorite Vonnegut book.   I guess I wouldn't say it's an overlooked book, but I wouldn't classify it as one of Vonnegut's iconic pieces.  When people think of VonnegutI think it is Cat's Cradle, Slaughterhouse 5 and Breakfast of Champions.

My take on Vonnegut is that he was brilliant, but he explored the same themes over and over.  It kinda cuts both ways.  It takes genius and insane talent to capture all the complexity and emotions and awesomeness in just one book.  OTOH, since he did it again and again, there's no compelling reason to try and read the entire oeuvre. 

It's kinda like any good artist, I guess.  Player Piano to me is rough around the edges and somewhat incomplete.  I feel like his other stuff is better.  OTOH, there's a rawness about it because it's an early attempt and that is also appealing.  So it's like do you like a group's technically best album, or do you like the debut?  You could make an argument either way.  Usually if I am late on a band, I start with the most culturally significant/acclaimed piece first.  And then the earlier stuff just seems like a rough draft and flawed attempt.  But if I get on board early, I always like the first album.  The later, perhaps technically better stuff just seems like polish and not as great as everyone says because the real meat of the philosophy/vision was already laid out prior to that.

daytime drinking

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2013, 10:43:17 AM »

i hadn't realized it until y'all started saying it, but i'm the friend who loans out all the books.  it's nice to be able to share what you love with someone and discuss it.  the books i read unfortunately aren't ones the missus will read, though she said she'd like to make an effort so we can have the aforementioned experience.  literately we only share a love for ayn rand  ;D.  no way should read another russian novelist.  she didn't care for anna karenina and i couldn't convince her to read any dostoyevsky no matter how much i tell her that he's amazing. 
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2013, 12:21:56 PM »

I'm with your wife.  Anna Karenina is boring and sucks.  I didn't enjoy any of Dostoyevsky's uber-novels, either.

But Dostoyevsky does have plenty of short stories and stuff, which I actually enjoy.  But even if you don't, it's only like 5 minutes of your time.  Maybe you could get her to read some of those, and if she likes them maybe you get lucky and can convince her to give Notes from the Underground a shot.

Your taste in books amuses me.  It seems like you dig Ayn Rand and stream-of-consciousness.  Which are polar opposites to me.  Rand is like all-business and stream-of-consciousness is meandering and abstract.  Plus I would bet that Rorke probably wouldn't have a lot of time for the typical tortured artist S-O-C protaganists just moping and drinking and having their own sorry little personal epiphanies.  Is it that dense, verbose-y kind of prose, maybe?  Do you like Joseph Conrad?

daytime drinking

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Re: books and how you acquire them
« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2013, 01:09:19 PM »

i was let down by anna karenina as well.  when she killed herself, the damage had already been done.  the book was fine without her.  it was great without her. but it couldn't have been written without her, unfortunately. 

i fucking love dostoyevsky.  i have notes from the underground but i haven't read it yet simply because it isn't long enough.  which isn't a reason not to read it it's just that every book i've read of his has engrossed me and it's always better than the one i've read and i somehow feel cheated that the underground isn't as lengthy. 

ayn rand is different and i will agree that her thoughts are better than her written word.  hell you probably wouldn't even agree with that.   :)  what i like about her is the power she gives to the individual.  i think the great thing about her was that she decided to become something.  she wanted to become a writer so she became one.  her philosophy didn't exist, so she became a philosopher.  whether you agree with her or not, lady's got gumption.  i wonder if she'd prefer to be called a man?

rourke was the epitome of a tortured artist, but yeah, he was otherwise an ideal citizen and the perfect man.  he can't exist but to find fault in his perfection you can't lie blame on ayn rand for writing a story about the perfect man.  if that made sense.  anyways, maybe in the fountainhead do we find origins for legitimate rape.  i still struggle with that part of the book

this is my first foray with joseph conrad.  it's taking me a well to get up to speed but the further i read the more i'm intrigued, the more i can't put the book down.  have you read lord jim?  it's told by a man telling the tale to others.  i couldn't grasp that concept at first.  i read and reread the intro and whatever they call the outro.  reminds me of my hip hop days

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