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Author Topic: 50 books in 2015  (Read 13049 times)

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c-lando

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #120 on: November 20, 2015, 04:12:42 PM »

1. "Me Before You" - Jojo Moyes
2. "Friendship" - Emily Gould - I'm not sure that I would recommend this to anyone, but it resonated with me.
3. "Revival" - Stephen King - I dug the the latest from Stephen King. I like his stuff when itís more on the nostalgic end of his spectrum than on the horror end.
4. "Shadow of Night" - Deborah Harkness (audiobook)
5. "The Silkworm" - Robert Galbraith (aka JK Rowling) - I enjoy Cormoran Strike as a detective character and I also like his sidekick, Robin. However, I did not really like this mystery AT ALL.
6. "The Vacationers" - Emma Straub
7. "Landline" - Rainbow Rowell
8. "The Black Echo" - Michael Connelly - the first book in the Harry Bosch series.
9. "The Girl on the Train" - Paula Hawkins
10. "The Burning Room" - the last book in the Harry Bosch series - I really like Harry's new partner. Wondering if Connelly is really preparing for Bosch's retirement by passing on the reader's affection to Lucky Lucy. She seems competent and likeable enough to carry her own series.
11. "The Last Coyote" - Michael Connelly - Harry tries to solve his own mother's murder. It's a dooooozie.
12. "Trunk Music" - Michael Connelly - Ah! I finally get more of the Harry and Eleanor origin story.
13. "The Concrete Blonde" - Michael Connelly
14. "Angels Flight" - Michael Connelly - I think I'm finally back on track for reading these Harry Bosch books in order. This one was pretty interesting in a time capsule sort of way. Life in LA after the 92 Riots. Life with the new internet superhighway.
15. "A Darkness More Than Night" - Michael Connelly
16. "The Middlesteins" - Jami Attenberg
17. "The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie" - Alan Bradley (audiobook)
18. "So You've Been Publicly Shamed" - Jon Ronson
19. "Delicious!" - Ruth Riechl - This was fluffy and fun.
20. "I'll Give You the Sun" - Jandy Nelson - Beautiful language, images, and themes. This was a jewel of a YA book.
21. "How to Start a Fire" - Lisa Lutz - her first new book after she finished up the Spellman series. I wanted to hate it (because I want her to go back to the Spellmans), but I loved it. Beautiful, complicated female friendships.
22. "City of Bones" - Michael Connelly - This is one of the two books that largely served as the basis for the first season of BOSCH. Despite knowing most of the plot, I still enjoyed reading this one.
23. "The Sky is Everywhere" - Jandy Nelson
24. "The Stranger" - Harlan Coben - This one walked the line for me as far as his books go. Some can be way too graphic/violent/gross for me. This one ALMOST tipped over. But, it was such a quick read that I pushed through the worst parts.
25. "Lost Light" - Michael Connelly - I finally know how Harry found out about Maddie. Weird to know he was a private dick at one time.
26. "The Narrows" - Michael Connelly - I think this may have been the first Connelly/Bosch book I ever read. It had been so long that I forgot that this was one of the ones I read already.
27. "The Closers" - Michael Connelly - I think this is my favorite Bosch book so far. High Jingo. Kiz. Irvin Irving. A nicely plotted mystery. A+.
28. "Echo Park" - Michael Connelly
29. "The Sister Brothers" - Patrick DeWitt
30. "The Killer Next Door" - Alex Marwood
31. "Attachments" - Rainbow Rowell - I guess I'm going to have to read her YA books because her adult books have totally been my cup of chick-lit tea.
32. "The Art of Secrets" - James Klise - Found this YA book when I was looking over a list of Edgar Award winners for 2015. Quick, enjoyable read. It was nice to follow/solve a mystery that didn't involve a dead person.
33. "Eleanor and Park" - Rainbow Rowell - Now I get why everyone LOVES her so much. I started out with her adult books and didn't dig into the YA side until this. AND, OH MY. I think many a WOXY fan can identify with these two characters. Easily.
34. "After You" - Jojo Moyes - her follow-up to "Me Before You".
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daytime drinking

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #121 on: November 30, 2015, 11:21:27 AM »


1.  the magic mountain- thomas mann
2.  the book- alan watts
3.  the river book: cincinnati and the ohio
4. the innocents abroad- mark twain
5. steppenwolf- hermann hesse                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
6. how to shit in the woods- kathleen meyer
7. the sot-weed factor- john barth
8.  we the living- ayn rand
9. the upanishads
10. the humanist in the bathtub- mary mcCarthy
11. the adirondacks- paul schneidner
12. the gambler/bobok/a nasty story- dostoyesvsky
13.  the satyricon- petronius

14. the pioneers- james fenimore cooper- apparently the least favorite of the leatherstocking series, it's however my first.  autobiographical in the setting  and the characters and mood.  if you ever wanted to know who settled cooperstown, it was his father.  set on the edge of the frontier in upstate new york on the cusp of the 19th century.  america in its infancy.  also in its infancy was manifest destiny.  the laws of man vs. the laws of nature.   it warms my heart that conversationalists existed way back when.  the book was in parts a joy to read and parts cumbersome.  i knew the background of a principle character would become important but i'm surprised i made it that far and obviously this was early on.  i wasn't paying attention.  it was very very descriptive.  i didn't mind that.  the characters were fresh and alive.  that natty bummpo, whom i've read is based on a real person but quite less humane (and more drunk) than the loyal natty.  looking forward to more fenimore 
« Last Edit: December 02, 2015, 07:21:25 PM by daytime drinking »
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MissKitty

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #122 on: December 06, 2015, 11:57:05 AM »

1. Upheaval Stories - Chris Holbrook
2. Tilly: The Ugliest Cat in the Shelter - Celia Haddon
3. Americanah - Chimamada Ngozi Adiche
4. Jamie Oliver's Comfort Food: The Ultimate Weekend Cookbook - Jamie Oliver
5. Jamie Oliver's Meals in Minutes - Jamie Oliver
6. Jamie Oliver's Great Britain - Jamie Oliver
7. Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania - Erik Larson
8. Barbed Wire Kisses: The Jesus ad Mary Chain Story - Zoe Howe
9. Going Off Alarming - Danny Baker
10. The Ginger & White Cookbook - Tonia George, Emma Scott and Nicholas Scott
11. Chinese Whiskers - Pallavi Aiyar
12. Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America - Jill Leovy
13. Match of My Life: 18 Saints Relive Their Greatest Games - Joe Batchelor and Alex Cook
14. Nick Drake Remembered For A While - The Authorized Companion to the Music of Nick Drake
15. The Borrower - Rebecca Makkai
16. Delicious! - Ruth Riechl
17. I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp - Richard Hell
18. An Army at Dawn - Rick Atkinson
19. Showa 1944-1953: A History of Japan - Shigeru Mizuki

20. All The Light We Cannot See - Anthony Doerr

Beautifully woven story following the parallel lives of a young blind French girl and a young German orphan boy during the years leading up to and encompassing WWII. The story shifts backward and forward through the years until both lives converge into a single moment in time. I can't really say much more about it without giving away the plot, but the story doesn't end the way the reader may think it will.

Gorgeous prose. Little wonder Doerr won a Pulitzer for it.

21. Reckless - Chrissie Hynde

Brutally honest account of Hynde's formative years, from childhood through the formation of The Pretenders. She is very candid about her drug abuse and her low self-esteem, and chronicles the abuse, battery and rape at the hands of biker "friends" with a shrug and a "I was too naive/stupid/fucked up to see it coming."

She comes across as not very likable much of the time (I personally always thought she was a prickly bitch in interviews), but I found her lack of filter refreshing overall. She has bags of indie cred and was part of the London punk scene from its very beginning, and she could easily brag, but instead she wears it as a badge of honor and simply tells what happened and how.

There is plenty she glosses over. Her version of life with Nick Kent is markedly different than Kent's (having read his memoir) - who to believe? Her liaison with Ray Davies is also relegated to footnote status, and she never mentions her 6-year marriage to Jim Kerr at all. Interesting, although I wouldn't want to admit to being married to that wanker either, to be fair.

Once the band is formed - nearly three quarters of the way through - the book speeds up considerably and the rich detail from the previous chapters is noticeably lacking. I'm guessing that after her life became extremely public when the band achieved success, she perhaps wanted to keep some stuff private. Or maybe she was too fucked up to recall much of it? Or possibly those memories are still too painful and raw?
« Last Edit: December 11, 2015, 11:26:22 AM by MissKitty »
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Cockney Rebel

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #123 on: December 14, 2015, 11:37:26 PM »

1 ● Graham Nash - Wild Tales: A Rock & Roll Life
2 ● Celia Haddon - Tilly: The Ugliest Cat in the Shelter
3 ● Drew Struzan & David J Schow - The Art of Drew Struzan
4 ● Nick Hornby - Funny Girl
5 ● Danny Baker - Going Off Alarming: The Autobiography Vol 2
6 ● Paul Torday - The Legacy of Hartlepool Hall
7 ● Mark Millar, Dave Gibbons, Matthew Vaughn - Huntsman: The Secret Service
8 ● Andy Stanton - You're a Bad Man, Mr Gum!
9 ● Joe Batchelor & Alex Crook - Match of my Life Southampton: 18 Stars Relive Their Greatest Games
10 ● Robin Halstead, Jason Hazeley, Alex Morris & Joel Morris - Bollocks to Alton Towers: Uncommonly British Days Out
11 ● Laurent Bouzereau - The Art of Bond
12 ● Bruce Eric Kaplan - This is a Bad Time
13 ● Guilia Enders - Gut: The Inside Story of our Body's Most Underrated Organ
adding
14 ● John Sweeney - The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology
I went to school and college with John Sweeney. He went onto appear on the BBC as a hugely respected investigative journalist. I went on to watch him. In 2007 this old friend of mine became an Internet sensation when, whilst filming a documentary about the 'fake church' of Scientology, he kind of "went off on one" shouting and screaming at his interviewee, a head honcho inside the organisation. It gave John instant notoriety, but became something that distracted from the other award winning journalism he's achieved. This book delves into exactly why he became (in his words) "an exploding tomato" and how the devious operations of the "church" brought him to that moment. How the church followed him wherever he went, seemed to know his every move and later even creepily turned up to observe his wedding. If anyone needs further proof that Scientology is little more than an evil scam, this book gives you what you need.
15 ● Mark Ellen - Rock Stars Stole My Life (A Big Bad Love Affair with Music)
Ellen has managed to write one of the most honest books about the machinations of the music industry, having been involved with the influential magazines Smash Hits, NME, Q, Mojo, Word and the TV show Old Grey Whistle Test. He was also one the handful of British broadcasters chosen to link the acts at Live Aid. He talk candidly about the acts he has come into contact with in his decades of journalism ("there are two types of people in the world, those who like Van Morrison and those who have met him") but is rarely cynical about the industry itself and what it mean to people. This book is a fun read, a very fun read indeed.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 11:48:55 PM by Cockney Rebel »
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daytime drinking

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #124 on: December 16, 2015, 01:28:10 AM »


1.  the magic mountain- thomas mann
2.  the book- alan watts
3.  the river book: cincinnati and the ohio
4. the innocents abroad- mark twain
5. steppenwolf- hermann hesse                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
6. how to shit in the woods- kathleen meyer
7. the sot-weed factor- john barth
8.  we the living- ayn rand
9. the upanishads
10. the humanist in the bathtub- mary mcCarthy
11. the adirondacks- paul schneidner
12. the gambler/bobok/a nasty story- dostoyesvsky
13.  the satyricon- petronius
14. the pioneers- james fenimore cooper

15. cry, the beloved country- alan paton- an unlikely travel story.  written just before apartheid was established in south africa.  the tale of a rural father and his pilgrimage to johannesburg to rebuild his tribe.  what he finds is heartbreaking.  i think this is an important book to read, not that it's necessary to read a book to have some idea of the footprint prevalent from colonization, but more from an awareness that we sometimes forget that people are people.  we all have our own background our own stories but we are all somebody's child
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #125 on: December 17, 2015, 11:23:19 PM »

I think the thing with A Walk in the Woods is that it is an outsider perspective on a thing that many people care deeply about.

There's a bit of unflattering hiker snobbery to it, like Bryson is a poseur who didn't even come close to hiking the whole thing.  And also like "I was doing the AT before doing the AT was cool."

But I think a more valid criticism is that Bryson does not treat the subject matter with much respect.  Imagine something that one of us is into-- drawing, music, sports, knitting, whatever.

Now imagine someone comes along who is not into that thing.  But not only are they not into it, they refuse to take it seriously and even try.  Like they join a band and just start banging guitar chords really loudly and obnoxiously.  Or like they just think it's funny to fall down, kick the ball to the other team.  If it's something you're not into, then someone being intentionally incompetent can be funny.  But if it is something you are passionate about it comes across like being a jerk.  Like "Haha, look how bad I am, and how bad I screwed it up, and why are you taking it something stupid so seriously?!?"

Bryson's trail etiquette is terrible.  He whines a lot.  He makes fun of the AT culture.  He's kind of like "Look at these weirdos.  Why can't they just drive from Georgia to Maine?"  It would be really annoying if everyone on the AT were like him.

BUT if you look at it like a book that is not really about the Appalachian Trail but about Bryson and his views as an untrustworthy narrator, it's fine.  He's a good writer.  He's pretty funny.  Journalistically, he does a lot of research and provides some interesting stories about the history of various places.  And it's not like he totally bashes hiking, the outdoors, or the AT... he just doesn't get really get it.  And the outside observer/fish-out-of-water is part of the charm.  It's just hard to have that perspective if you are passionate about hiking.

The book would be more acceptable to hikers I think if Bryson kind of tied it up with a pretty summary of how he came to respect nature, or how doing the hike changed him, or even how this is not his thing but he can appreciate the passion and commitment of those for whom this is their thing.  But he kind of doesn't.  In fact it's kind of the opposite.  The first half of the book reads like a historical/cultural/travelogue kind of thing that's really interesting and gets you interested in the AT. 

But then he kind of gets more cynical and bitter as it goes on.  Which is understandable when you attempt to do something arduous. I love hiking but I don't love it THAT much. I'd be a pretty angry dude if I tried to thru-hike the AT.  But remember, he's totally unprepared and out-of-shape.  So it's kind of like sour grapes.  He did a half-ass job and of course that's what he gets but instead of admitting it, he's just like "Oh, this is stupid."

I think the worst part is not that he didn't finish, but that he sort of disrespects those that have by saying in his mind he did.  Like an actor who plays a soldier in a movie going on a talk show saying they know what it's like to be in a war.

I don't think that was Bryson's intent.  I think it's really supposed to be more of a character study/internal monologue with the AT hike serving as an amusing backdrop to spice it up.  And it's okay to see his "I did it in spirit" and other perceived slights as a weak rationalization or biased observations of a flawed, but human character.

I liked it, but even as a simple dayhiker parts of it bugged me, so I can understand why a lot of serious AT hikers absolutely hate it.

va-vacious

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #126 on: December 18, 2015, 09:35:12 AM »

ZK, my uncle through-hiked the AT a few years ago (he did it in sections over time). When we asked him what he'd tell someone who wanted to do it, he said he'd tell them, "Don't!" I think he completed it mostly because he's too darn stubborn to not finish it, but I think the last hundred or so miles were absolute torture.

He's now trying to do all the trails in the Smokey Mtns National Park. Though he keeps retiring from hiking!
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va-vacious

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #127 on: December 18, 2015, 09:35:57 AM »

33. "Eleanor and Park" - Rainbow Rowell - Now I get why everyone LOVES her so much. I started out with her adult books and didn't dig into the YA side until this. AND, OH MY. I think many a WOXY fan can identify with these two characters. Easily.
This has been sitting in my to read pile since it first came out in paperback. Purchased based on the title alone, for some reason.  ;)

I hope to be able to add to my list again by the end of the year.

You must have bought it twice, since I have your copy at my house...
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Dan

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #128 on: December 18, 2015, 01:41:03 PM »

I'm not a hiker at all, which is why I found it informative and interesting. Maybe if you're a day hiker you see lots of issues with it, but since I could't find much to criticize, I quite loved it.

Quote
The book would be more acceptable to hikers I think if Bryson kind of tied it up with a pretty summary of how he came to respect nature, or how doing the hike changed him, or even how this is not his thing but he can appreciate the passion and commitment of those for whom this is their thing.  But he kind of doesn't.  In fact it's kind of the opposite.

I ... I felt like he did indeed do this stuff. Everyone's allowed to interpret a story in their own way, of course, but my interpretation was that he did respect nature even moreso after the hikes, and he was changed for the better, and such.

Quote
I think the worst part is not that he didn't finish, but that he sort of disrespects those that have by saying in his mind he did.  Like an actor who plays a soldier in a movie going on a talk show saying they know what it's like to be in a war.
This is a fair point.

I think the part that I was MOST disappointed with was... when he and Katz quit for a while. Not the part when they get in a car and skip a significant portion of the hike, but just when he says (paraphrase) "I had some commitments to attend to and Katz was going to Iowa to work construction for the summer." After that the book was much less interesting and boring until the small part in the end with the 100-mile wilderness.


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Ella Minnow Pea

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #129 on: December 19, 2015, 04:37:21 PM »

33. "Eleanor and Park" - Rainbow Rowell - Now I get why everyone LOVES her so much. I started out with her adult books and didn't dig into the YA side until this. AND, OH MY. I think many a WOXY fan can identify with these two characters. Easily.
This has been sitting in my to read pile since it first came out in paperback. Purchased based on the title alone, for some reason.  ;)

I hope to be able to add to my list again by the end of the year.

You must have bought it twice, since I have your copy at my house...
I never said WHERE my to read pile is located.  ;)
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #130 on: December 19, 2015, 10:07:58 PM »

Is anyone here on Goodreads or something similar?

I would be interested in social media'ing in some way about books.  I am on Goodreafs but not the best about updating. 

I wish I were more indie-ish about books.  With music, I know what I like and how to find it.  But with books I just kind of read what gets the best reviews. 

trixi

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #131 on: December 20, 2015, 01:04:16 PM »

I am on Goodreads.  I don't write a review for every book I read, but always rate them.  It helps me keep track of what I have read, what I want to read (especially if it's something that hasn't come out yet or that I need to order in from a different library system), and allows me to make suggestions to friends or patrons when asked for something to read. 
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c-lando

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #132 on: December 21, 2015, 09:15:34 AM »

I signed up but haven't really done anything with it. Maybe if I had some friends over there...
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c-lando

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #133 on: December 21, 2015, 09:16:49 AM »

1. "Me Before You" - Jojo Moyes
2. "Friendship" - Emily Gould - I'm not sure that I would recommend this to anyone, but it resonated with me.
3. "Revival" - Stephen King - I dug the the latest from Stephen King. I like his stuff when itís more on the nostalgic end of his spectrum than on the horror end.
4. "Shadow of Night" - Deborah Harkness (audiobook)
5. "The Silkworm" - Robert Galbraith (aka JK Rowling) - I enjoy Cormoran Strike as a detective character and I also like his sidekick, Robin. However, I did not really like this mystery AT ALL.
6. "The Vacationers" - Emma Straub
7. "Landline" - Rainbow Rowell
8. "The Black Echo" - Michael Connelly - the first book in the Harry Bosch series.
9. "The Girl on the Train" - Paula Hawkins
10. "The Burning Room" - the last book in the Harry Bosch series - I really like Harry's new partner. Wondering if Connelly is really preparing for Bosch's retirement by passing on the reader's affection to Lucky Lucy. She seems competent and likeable enough to carry her own series.
11. "The Last Coyote" - Michael Connelly - Harry tries to solve his own mother's murder. It's a dooooozie.
12. "Trunk Music" - Michael Connelly - Ah! I finally get more of the Harry and Eleanor origin story.
13. "The Concrete Blonde" - Michael Connelly
14. "Angels Flight" - Michael Connelly - I think I'm finally back on track for reading these Harry Bosch books in order. This one was pretty interesting in a time capsule sort of way. Life in LA after the 92 Riots. Life with the new internet superhighway.
15. "A Darkness More Than Night" - Michael Connelly
16. "The Middlesteins" - Jami Attenberg
17. "The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie" - Alan Bradley (audiobook)
18. "So You've Been Publicly Shamed" - Jon Ronson
19. "Delicious!" - Ruth Riechl - This was fluffy and fun.
20. "I'll Give You the Sun" - Jandy Nelson - Beautiful language, images, and themes. This was a jewel of a YA book.
21. "How to Start a Fire" - Lisa Lutz - her first new book after she finished up the Spellman series. I wanted to hate it (because I want her to go back to the Spellmans), but I loved it. Beautiful, complicated female friendships.
22. "City of Bones" - Michael Connelly - This is one of the two books that largely served as the basis for the first season of BOSCH. Despite knowing most of the plot, I still enjoyed reading this one.
23. "The Sky is Everywhere" - Jandy Nelson
24. "The Stranger" - Harlan Coben - This one walked the line for me as far as his books go. Some can be way too graphic/violent/gross for me. This one ALMOST tipped over. But, it was such a quick read that I pushed through the worst parts.
25. "Lost Light" - Michael Connelly - I finally know how Harry found out about Maddie. Weird to know he was a private dick at one time.
26. "The Narrows" - Michael Connelly - I think this may have been the first Connelly/Bosch book I ever read. It had been so long that I forgot that this was one of the ones I read already.
27. "The Closers" - Michael Connelly - I think this is my favorite Bosch book so far. High Jingo. Kiz. Irvin Irving. A nicely plotted mystery. A+.
28. "Echo Park" - Michael Connelly
29. "The Sister Brothers" - Patrick DeWitt
30. "The Killer Next Door" - Alex Marwood
31. "Attachments" - Rainbow Rowell - I guess I'm going to have to read her YA books because her adult books have totally been my cup of chick-lit tea.
32. "The Art of Secrets" - James Klise - Found this YA book when I was looking over a list of Edgar Award winners for 2015. Quick, enjoyable read. It was nice to follow/solve a mystery that didn't involve a dead person.
33. "Eleanor and Park" - Rainbow Rowell - Now I get why everyone LOVES her so much. I started out with her adult books and didn't dig into the YA side until this. AND, OH MY. I think many a WOXY fan can identify with these two characters. Easily.
34. "After You" - Jojo Moyes - her follow-up to "Me Before You".
35. "Shovel Ready" - Adam Sternbergh
36. "Fates and Furies" - Lauren Groff
« Last Edit: December 29, 2015, 10:44:21 AM by c-lando »
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Zafer Kaya

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Re: 50 books in 2015
« Reply #134 on: December 21, 2015, 10:36:55 AM »

35. "Fates and Furies" - Lauren Groff

This was the one book I was most excited about reading this year.  I was going to buy it when it came out, but then I decided to get it from the library. 

There was only 1 person per copy ahead of me at the time, so I figured I could wait three weeks. So, I put a hold on it but I guess I did it wrong and added it to my wishlist instead.  By the time I realized this, it was early December and it was showing up on everyone's Best of 2015 lists and getting nominated for all these awards.

So I should have just bought it then, because the wait list was like forever now.  Except I refused because to me, I'd been waiting on it for two months and buying felt like giving up.  I felt like I put all this work in (even though it was only a misspent 30 seconds on account of I screwed up). 

Now there's still 6 people ahead of me per copy.  So I am hellbent on getting this book FROM THE LIBRARY and reading it.  Except by the time I finally get it, I'll be so annoyed at having waited so long that I'll probably hate it. 

I think they let people have too many "Holds" in libraries.  I feel like everyone over-holds.  Because most books I want to read are on hold and then, because you can put like 28 books on hold, I figure I might as well put everything I'm somewhat interested in on hold.  Which then makes someone else wait longer.

I think I have 6 books on hold right now.  If you limited me to the three books I most wanted to read, it would move 3 books up the queue.  And if everyone else could only hold three books, all my stuff would move up faster, too.  Plus I would read those three books really fast because I'm into them.  I would probably have them back in a week.

But instead I will probably get my 6th choice book first.  And I will probably take a full 28 days to read it because I'm just not that into it.  And the people I know who read a ton usually have at least 10-15 books on hold.  Which means sometimes they get nada, and then sometimes 3 books will come free all at once.  And if you have three books out at once you will have to keep them longer because you're reading 3 books at the same time.

The only thing is, people are naturally hoarders so I don't think people will want to give up all their holds.  So my alternative solution is to implement the "Super Hold." 

The rules of the Super Hold are: 

1)  A Super Hold means you jump ahead of everyone who has the book on regular hold.
2)  You can only put 1 book on Super Hold at a time.
3)  Books on Super Hold most be returned within 10 days.
4)  Only eBooks can be put on Super Hold.  That way they are for sure in and out in 10 days.  There is no waiting on someone to pick up the book or not returning it on time.
5)  You cannot use more than 20 Super Holds a year.

I should go back and get my MLS.  I could revolutionize the industry.
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