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Author Topic: Hunter S. Thompson, RIP  (Read 5032 times)

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slow-dog

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Hunter S. Thompson, RIP
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2005, 12:28:08 PM »

Quote from: "Kwyjibo"
Anybody want to go over the high points of this person's career?  I've honestly never even heard of this guy.

That happens to me a lot around here.


I agree with RVA-- Fear and Loathing is a good book.  I've seen this passage quoted twice this morning, and I think it's a pretty good example of Thompson at his peak:

Quote
It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—that kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run. . . .

My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder's jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn't need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.
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pathogen

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Hunter S. Thompson, RIP
« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2005, 12:46:51 PM »

Better Than Sex is also a good HST read.

i don't care so much about what the man was like in person, i never met the guy.  i liked his work and was saddened by the news.... more so after seeing the direction this thread went.  we don't know why he did this. some ppl are done.  that's it.
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pathogen

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Hunter S. Thompson, RIP
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2005, 12:49:40 PM »

i was just reminded of another good HST book, The Great Shark Hunt.
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Nate

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Hunter S. Thompson, RIP
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2005, 01:21:58 PM »

Quote from: "Butter"

No, my opinion is not wrong.  Yours is.  To call every suicide a "chicken-shit" way out is wrong.


Believe what you want, but don't discount my experiences as fake because you see things another way.
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rva

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Hunter S. Thompson, RIP
« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2005, 01:59:18 PM »

I guess my feelings on suicide are somewhat similar to L. Diddy's and JR's.

If you have children that depend on you, you need to hang in there.  But absent that, I think you can take yourself out whenever you want.  Your loved ones will suffer briefly, and they'll probably retain a bit of sadness the rest of their lives.  That suffering is probably much, much less than what you were going through.  Sometimes mental illness or even simple sadness just isn't curable.  

Yes, suicide is selfish in a sense.  But you're allowed to be selfish about certain things.  And I can't imagine anything more personal and more important than one's continued existence.  I don't see why anyone else gets to make the call on whether I live or die.  And I don't see why I should continue to exist and suffer horribly simply because it makes you happy.  

I also think if I've lived a good happy life, and I feel fullfilled and like I've done everything I want then I will punch out on my own terms rather than have my last remaining time spent dealing with mental illness or acute physical distress.  I wouldn't want anyone to feel sad for me, and they shouldn't.  It's like I gave it a good run, I'm dying happy and with no regrets.  There shouldn't be any moral stigma attached to that at all.

It's not sad because Thompson committed suicide.  It's sad because we won't get to read anymore of his stuff.  The specific way in which it happened is irrelevant.  Like JR said, when it's your time to go, it's your time.

Let's just say I personally don't feel comfortable anyone else's needs above the need of the victim.  Some people want one thing, the person most impacted by the decision wants another.  One side gets their way at the expense of the other.  I wouldn't call either side "selfish," that's just the way it works.
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pathogen

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Hunter S. Thompson, RIP
« Reply #20 on: February 21, 2005, 03:55:47 PM »

Quote from: "rva"
It's sad because we won't get to read anymore of his stuff.  The specific way in which it happened is irrelevant.

 =D>
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Cockney Rebel

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Hunter S. Thompson, RIP
« Reply #21 on: February 21, 2005, 04:44:54 PM »

Quote from: "rva"
Yes, suicide is selfish in a sense.  But you're allowed to be selfish about certain things.  And I can't imagine anything more personal and more important than one's continued existence.  I don't see why anyone else gets to make the call on whether I live or die.  And I don't see why I should continue to exist and suffer horribly simply because it makes you happy.  

I also think if I've lived a good happy life, and I feel fullfilled and like I've done everything I want then I will punch out on my own terms rather than have my last remaining time spent dealing with mental illness or acute physical distress.  I wouldn't want anyone to feel sad for me, and they shouldn't.  It's like I gave it a good run, I'm dying happy and with no regrets.  There shouldn't be any moral stigma attached to that at all


As always, the sage voice of utterly reasoned comment by RVA.
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