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Author Topic: Spotify Playlists to glom upon  (Read 379 times)

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lutz

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 949
Re: Spotify Playlists to glom upon
« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2014, 03:19:49 PM »

I agree on some of those, and there's definitely some improvements to be made. But I gotta say bro, for somebody who called it a "clunky, unintuitive, unresponsive pos" your list of complaints are kinda nitpicky here
If it was one thing it would be nitpicky, but all of those little nitpicks accumulate into an overall frustrating experience. I don't want to be frustrated. I want to find new music.
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Zafer Kaya

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 2,073
Re: Spotify Playlists to glom upon
« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2014, 04:50:44 PM »

Yeah, I gave up on Pandora years ago for that same reason. I think LastFM does a decent job of recommending similar artists that I might like, but I very rarely ever use their service for anything more than scrobbling although I do like that they offer free back catalog downloads of artists I like and listen to. That's a nice feature, but not enough to get me to pay for it.

I'm okay with Last.FM because they don't make you listen to it.  They just pop up a group of similar bands on a page, and you can ignore most of them.  If there's one you don't know but seems interesting then you click on it.  It's not like you have to listen your way through a playlist (with limited skips).

The other thing is last.fm has a filter for "NEW music recommended for you."  Pandora and the others for whatever reason don't let you filter songs for recency.  That would fix 90% of the problem where they're recommending stuff you've quite obviously already heard.

But anyway, the reason I hate stations is that seems to be what most people want instead of more interesting features.  And it seems like people don't want to listen to albums anymore.  They just tune in their Pandora station to hear the same songs over and over.  It's basically like going back to old-school radio, only with legal Payola.


euro60

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 2,102
Re: Spotify Playlists to glom upon
« Reply #32 on: October 07, 2014, 10:17:11 PM »

I don't do any of these streaming services (ol' school guy that I am, I suppose). Yet I keep finding new music. It's a mix of getting word of mouth (thanks, Randomville boarders, among others, and of course my daughter), seeing bands at concerts and festivals, and hearing about it by pure happenstance here and there. I'm okay with that, limitations and all. I mean, how much new music can you really absorb? There is literally so much new stuff out there, I think it's impossible to "get it all", so I don't even try. But I'm happy where I'm at.
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"A blind faith in authority is the worst enemy of truth" - Albert Einstein (1901)

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra is one of Cincinnati's underappreciated treasures

Zafer Kaya

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 2,073
Re: Spotify Playlists to glom upon
« Reply #33 on: October 08, 2014, 10:59:07 AM »

I have no trouble finding new music.  But it's not about me.  It's that our listening patterns are a huge flaw in their model.

No one is making money with the whole "You get .00001 a play" model.  Spotify is gaining users, but not making a profit.  The artists are not too happy with their slice of the cut.

Users who listen/download a lot, but with all sorts of different artists, none of whom are well-known are using up a ton of bandwidth, and memory storage on their servers.  It's highly inefficient.  Plus, I'm guessing most of us tend to listen to albums more and are not happy about hearing ads.  And we don't click on artist ads or Spotify recommends because that's not how we discover music and we know what we want.  So there's less revenue generation.

They are losing money on people like us.  For now they are okay with it so they can boast the biggest userbase and catalog but at some point they need to turn a profit.

Of the millions and millions of songs these guys have, probably 10% of them account for 90% of all plays.  So just reduce your catalog by 50% or more, and get rid of the 10% of users who eat up all your bandwidth listening to obscure crap.  The guy who listens maybe an hour or two a day or just caches an album once a month is they guy they want.

And that guy wants basically a slightly-customizable set of radio stations, where you can deliver ads between songs.  Basically they want radio, just on the internet.  And on the internet, there's no payola so labels can pay for play as well. 

That's the problem.  The music rental model doesn't work.  The radio station model does, or at least might.

The Ugly Thief

  • Summer Resident
  • Posts: 16
Re: Spotify Playlists to glom upon
« Reply #34 on: October 13, 2014, 02:04:58 PM »

Zafer - everything you said is true, but I really don't see the stream music model going away. In one financial setup or another it's here to stay.

My guess is that over the next few years we will begin to see cable & satellite services offering music streaming services with libraries comparable to Rdio or Spotify. If that's the case then online services such as Rdio and Spotify will be forced to carry out their own business maneuvers (merges etc). Maybe with each other, maybe with others such as Halu etc. There's already been rumors of Spotify going into TV in one form or another. They're gonna need capital to do that.
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Zafer Kaya

  • City Elder
  • Posts: 2,073
Re: Spotify Playlists to glom upon
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2014, 04:13:24 PM »

Streaming won't go away, because it's the future-- the whole Internet of Things, etc.  Everything's going to be streamed.

But the music industry as we know it is dead.  No one thinks music is worth paying for.  Spotify's only interest is building up the biggest user base possible so that they can be bought out by someone else or alternatively take that userbase into a different business that can actually generate revenue.

I think that music will just be Bandcamp or YouTube.  There won't be a shortage of people wanting to create music, and now it's dirt cheap for them to do it.  So you'll just have people doing it sort of as a hobby.  Mostly you just want your creations out there, and if you can maybe make enough money to subsidize your hobby or at best supplement your income a little that's enough.  Basically Bandcamp is Etsy for musicians.  Which isn't such a bad thing.  After all you can't get much more indie than that. 



The Ugly Thief

  • Summer Resident
  • Posts: 16
Re: Spotify Playlists to glom upon
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2014, 06:59:31 PM »

you'll just have people doing it sort of as a hobby.  Mostly you just want your creations out there, and if you can maybe make enough money to subsidize your hobby or at best supplement your income a little that's enough

Yes, there will be a larger abundance of DIY's in the upcoming future, for all the reasons you stated. But there will always be professional artists as well. I think ultimately recorded music will be a way of supplementing & promoting their income - with their main source of income being live performances. Financially, I think it's already that way (I would have to see the artists' income statements). But the difference is that right now artists tour to promote the album. In the future they'll be recording to promote the tour.

I know it's already like that to a degree (I think it just depends on which artist you talk to).
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